Felt

Exhibition Update

 

 

We opened our Z Twist exhibition at the Pink Cabbage Gallery in Stroud on Saturday 31st May. It was a great relief to finally see the work in situ’ and the long wall I used, created exactly the right effect. It was amazing to see how each of us had used a dominant grey  and even though our work was very different, the greys created a strong connection between us, which really seemed to pull the whole exhibition together.

 

 

 

Opening day

Opening day

 

'Revolutions 1 & 2'

‘Revolutions 1 & 2’

 

 

The following is from my information panel at the exhibition:

” Z Twist has meant a Stroud residency for Lucy, an area and town previously unknown to her and therefore an exciting opportunity for a new voyage of discovery. She quickly ascertained Stroud’s rich woollen heritage and began experimenting with methods of felting starting with locally sourced fleeces. Her industry partner WSP, who manufacture high quality billiard table and tennis ball cloth, have been a key influence in her work for Z Twist. Through guided visits to their mills at Cam and Stroud and supplying the materials for the project, Lucy says “their support has been brilliant”. As a way of expressing her merging ideas she has created an experimental group of objects related to a theme based around the idea of cogs, wheels, war and industry. The theme has been developed through making observations, collecting information about the woollen industry in Stroud and Somerset, and investigation into the processes and methods of felting. The forms she has created are characteristically organic and careful use has been of the strong colours from her industry partner.”

'Archive 1 &2'

‘Archive 1 &2’

 

 

Stroud blog update 3

This week I have been continuing to card wool and and make felt discs whilst waiting to collect the samples from WSP.It’s amazing how the felted wool varies.
The fibre from the Dartmoor fleece is long with beautiful curly white locks which when felted, creates a texture of wiry swirls.
The Shetland fibre’s are shorter, softer and springy creating a much closer, uneven texture when felted. The colour of the fibres vary from light grey to dark brown which makes an interesting contrast between the white Llyen and Dartmoor.

Dartmoor locks

Dartmoor locks

Felted Dartmoor

Felted Dartmoor

Felted Shetland

Felted Shetland

I have also been considering how best to present the final work for exhibition. I saw the piece of work below by Chinese American artist Beili-Liu which impressed me by it’s simplicity and stunning visual effect. The little red coil discs are probably only about 6cm in diameter. They are pierced and suspended with a needle of red thread which continues under the coil and onto the floor creating a thread drawing.

It is vital that the way I show my cog pieces imparts a sense of meaning integral to the narrative of the work. I think being able to view them them all at the height of a flower or teasel would be a really interesting solution.

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I am thrilled to bits with the car full of samples I have just collected  from WSP. They have been so generous and I can’t wait to start trying things out. Apart from the beautifully finished red, green and white billiard and yellow tennis cloth,  I also have masses of unmilled white woollen cloth that will blend well with my made felt pieces. The waste metal bands photographed below I hope to use, possibly as supports for larger fabric pieces, also as a contrasting construction material. Oh, and I also have three big black bags of waste fibres for stuffing………Thank you WSP!

Meters of milled and unmilled fabric from WSP.

Meters of milled and unmilled fabric from WSP.

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Waste metal bands that wrap wool bales